CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Association between menthol cigarette smoking and current use of electronic cigarettes among us adolescents.
Israel Agaku 1  
 
 
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Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Israel Agaku   

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA, 677 Huntington Avenue, 02115 Boston, United States
Publish date: 2017-05-25
Submission date: 2017-05-08
Acceptance date: 2017-05-08
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2017;3(May Supplement):97
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ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Some e-cigarette manufacturers have marketed e-cigarette flavors branded after popular menthol cigarette brands, such as Newport. Such targeted marketing has the potential to increase the likelihood of e-cigarette initiation among menthol cigarette smokers. This study examined the association between menthol cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use among US middle and high school students.

Material and Methods:
Data were from the 2014-2015 (N=39,718) National Youth Tobacco Survey, a school based survey of students in grades 6-12. Reasons for e-cigarette use by self-reported menthol status were compared using chi-squared tests. Association between menthol cigarette smoking and current (past 30 day) e-cigarette use was measured using a marginal structural logistic regression model.

Results:
Current e-cigarette use prevalence was higher among menthol (58.5%) than nonmenthol (47.5%) cigarette smokers (p<0.001). The following reasons for e-cigarette use were more prevalent among menthol versus nonmenthol cigarette smokers, respectively for: smoking cessation (26.2% vs. 18.4%, p=0.0163); imitation of celebrity role models (4.4% vs. 1.1%, p=0.0013); attractive flavors (45.8% vs. 34.5%, p=0.004); and situational use in areas with smoking prohibitions (29.5% vs. 21.7%, p=0.0109). Logistic regression analyses among all cigarette smokers revealed higher odds of current e-cigarette use among menthol than nonmenthol cigarette smokers (aOR=1.56, 95%CI=1.24-1.97); analyses restricted to cigarette smokers who first tried cigarettes before any other tobacco product yielded consistent results (aOR=1.40, 95%CI=1.06-1.85).

Conclusions:
Current e-cigarette use was significantly higher among menthol than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. These findings underscore the importance of efforts to reduce all forms of tobacco product use, including e-cigarettes, among youth.

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