RESEARCH PAPER
Awareness about effects of tobacco and areca-nut use in school children of Ahmedabad, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey
 
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1
LJ Institute of Physiotherapy, Ahmedabad, India
2
SBB College of Physiotherapy, Ahmedabad, India
3
Mission Health Physiotherapy Clinic, Ahmedabad, India
Publish date: 2018-10-24
Submission date: 2017-09-18
Final revision date: 2018-10-13
Acceptance date: 2018-10-15
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2018;4(October):34
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
Introduction:
Tobacco use usually starts in the adolescent age group and continues in adulthood. This study’s aim was to identify knowledge regarding the adverse effects of tobacco and areca-nut use among high school children of Ahmedabad, India.

Methods:
An anonymous self-administered close-ended questionnaire was designed for the study. Principals of 9 schools, 3 municipal and 6 government-aided, were approached and written informed consent was obtained. A total of 3055 students studying in grades 7–12 were included. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS 16.0. Chi-squared test was applied to investigate any differences between the responses of consumers and non-consumers, while Cramer’s V was applied to analyze the strength of association between the awareness of ill-effects and tobacco product consumption.

Results:
Of the 3055 children, 3% felt that tobacco use was definitely not harmful to health while 84% felt that it was. In all, 65% of respondents were aware that tobacco use caused cancer, 7% answered that it caused breathing problems, 5% said it caused heart problems, 0.3% answered that it caused paralysis, 4.3% felt it caused no health problems, whereas 18% thought that it caused multiple issues. With regards to the role of media, 78% had seen many anti-smoking warnings in the media, 15% had seen a few, 5% had seen none. There was a statistically significant difference between the tobacco users and and non-users with regards to exposure to media (p<0.001), discussions in class (p<0.001) and general awareness (p<0.001), but a weak association between awareness and tobacco consumption was identified (p<0.05).

Conclusions:
Awareness about the harmful effects of tobacco is high among school children of Ahmedabad, though use may still be prevalent.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Priya Singh Rangey   
LJ Institute of Physiotherapy, E-502, Devnandan Platina, Opposite Shayona Tilak, Near Vande Mataram City, Gota, 382481 Ahmedabad, India
 
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