CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Burden of disease from exposure to secondhand smoke in children in Europe
 
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1
Study, Prevention & Oncologic Network Institute (ISPRO), Florence, Italy
2
Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy
3
Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
4
CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Pública, Barcelona, Spain
5
IIB Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain
6
Polytechnic University of Cartagena, Cartagena, Spain
7
Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, Spain
8
Catalan Institute of Oncology, L’Hopitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
9
Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, L’Hopitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
10
University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
11
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Respiratory Diseases, Barcelona, Spain
Publication date: 2020-10-22
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2020;6(Supplement):A15
 
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ABSTRACT
Background:
Second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure at home is a major cause of disease among children. The widely spread of smoking bans in public places in the last decades favored the adoption of voluntary smoking bans in homes.

Objectives:
To quantify the health consequences of such voluntary smoking bans in European Union (EU) countries, we analysed the burden of diseases from low birth weight, lower respiratory infections, asthma, otits media and sudden infant death syndrome due to SHS exposure in children and pregnant women in the period 2006-2017.

Methods:
We used the Comparative Risk Assessment method and we estimated the prevalence of household SHS exposure in children and the SHS exposure in pregnant women using a multiple imputation procedure based on the Eurobarometer surveys. Data on mortality and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) were collected using official statistics data and estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study.

Results:
In EU countries SHS exposure in children and in pregnant women stalled in the period 2006-2017, as well as their attributable burden. In 2017 the proportion of deaths and DALYs (on total) attributable to SHS exposure in EU countries was respectively 1.4% and 0.7%, mainly form low birth weight. The highest proportions were estimated in Eastern EU countries, and the lowest in Northern.

Conclusions:
This study suggests that comprehensive smoking ban legislations are able to reduce SHS exposure in homes and its burden in children a few years after the adoption of the legislation. However, in 2017 the burden from SHS exposure in children is still not negligible.

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