CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
FCTC "Orphans" - Article 14, 19 and supply side measures
 
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1
Action on Smoking and Health, United States
2
International Centre for Tobacco Cessation, United Kingdom
Publish date: 2019-03-26
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2019;5(Supplement):A83
KEYWORDS
FCTC
 
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ABSTRACT
The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) has been successful in many ways. However, some articles have received less attention than others. Other issues, such as some supply side measures, were left out of the FCTC altogether. This presentation will focus on Article 14 (cessation), Article 19 (liability) and supply side measures.
Article 14 of the FCTC requires that parties develop cessation guidelines , yet only 40% of parties have them. The presenter will discuss what is needed for cessation measures to be effective and how a human-rights based approach can help convince governments to act.
Article 19 of the FCTC concerns tobacco companies’ liability for their actions. While some countries (ie. the US) have been very productive in their use of civil liability, no country has yet successfully utilized the other half of Article 19 - criminal liability. The presenter will illustrate how these arguments can be used in both criminal cases and as part of a human rights-based approach.
Regarding the supply of tobacco, the FCTC only covered illicit trade, sales to and by minors and provisions to support economically viable alternatives. As we strive to move closer to our goal of zero tobacco deaths, it is time to start talking about what can be done to further restrict the supply side of tobacco by addressing the retail environment, a topic that was excluded from the FCTC. There are many options, including licensing restrictions, a state sponsored dispensary model, and Tobacco Free Generation policies. The presenter will discuss how policies could work in different jurisdictions and outline the human rights arguments available to pressure governments to act.
Presenters will discuss what governments and advocates can do to finally address these “orphans” and how these topics are essential to the tobacco “endgame.”
eISSN:2459-3087