RESEARCH PAPER
Federally qualified health center use of the Nebraska Tobacco Quitline
 
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University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Kelly Gonzales   

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, 68198- 5330, United States
Publish date: 2019-11-19
Submission date: 2019-07-15
Final revision date: 2019-10-22
Acceptance date: 2019-10-24
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2019;5(November):43
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Promoting cessation services like quitlines is important to reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. A critical need exists to improve clinical staff’s awareness of tobacco quitlines and reduce barriers in recommending and referring tobacco-using patients. The purpose was to obtain information on the use of the Nebraska Tobacco Quitline (NTQ) by Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinical staff at FQHC settings with tobacco-using patients. Specific aims were: 1) identify FQHC clinical staff and setting characteristics that influence current tobacco cessation assessment and interventions, and 2) identify barriers and facilitators that influence future use of NTQ by FQHC clinical staff and settings.

Methods:
This study recruited participants from seven FQHC settings. All FQHC provider and non-provider clinical staff were recruited to complete a Clinical Staff Survey. The Medical Director, Associate Medical Director, or Nurse Manager at each FQHC was asked to provide setting information through the Setting Survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report percentages and qualitative data were analyzed using pattern coding.

Results:
The main findings include insufficient awareness and insufficient perceived effectiveness of NTQ, non-providers reporting a limited role in tobacco cessation efforts beyond assessment of tobacco use, and the lack of supportive setting processes for intervention use.

Conclusions:
Targeted efforts are needed to increase awareness and perceived effectiveness of NTQ, for role expansion for non-providers, and to add Electronic Health Record (EHR) prompts and e-referral capability to increase cessation interventions including NTQ referrals. Future research is suggested to better understand patient-specific barriers in using NTQ.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors acknowledge UNMC Center for Patient, Family, and Community Engagement in Chronic Care Management (CENTRIC) and UNMC College of Nursing for their continued support of research endeavors. In addition, the authors acknowledge Suzanne Forkner for her time and insight into Nebraska Tobacco Quitline, through several personal communications during 2017–2018.
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
There was no source of funding for this research.
AUTHORS' CONTRIBUTIONS
KG provided conception and design of the work including the surveys with critical review provided by KF. KG interpreted data for the work with critical review provided by AB. KG drafted the final manuscript and AB and KF provided critical revision. All authors provided approval of the version submitted for publication. All authors agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work including accuracy and integrity of the work.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
 
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