CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Prerequisites, components and barriers to the implementation of a smoking cessation training course for medical residents in Armenia
 
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Zvart Avedisian Onanian Center for Health Services Research and Development, Gerald and Patricia Turpanjian School of Public Health, American University of Armenia
Publish date: 2018-06-13
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2018;4(Supplement):A123
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Introduction:
Studies suggest that trained physicians are about twice as likely to offer help to patients who smoke in contrast to non-trained physicians. Yet, inadequate training on tobacco dependence and its treatment is one of the major obstacles for consistent and effective treatment of tobacco dependence. The study aimed to explore the needed resources, prerequisites, components and barriers for implementing a pilot smoking cessation training course for medical residents in Armenia to provide practical skills and knowledge on smoking cessation counseling.

Methods:
The research team utilized a qualitative research method by conducting four focus group discussions (overall 14 residents participated in the discussions) with medical residents from Yerevan State Medical University and four in-depth interviews with medical faculty members and administrators. The participants were recruited using convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Directed content analysis was utilized for data analysis.

Results:
The main preconditions for teaching a smoking cessation training course were the residents’ exposure to tobacco related topics during the years of study, having some experience in advising smokers to quit and in managing patients, and negative attitude toward patient’s smoking. The duration of the training and use of active learning methods were likely to be the important components in planning and implementing the training course. Finally, the major barriers mentioned by participants included lack of time to attend the training due to clinical duties, underestimation of the physician’s role in patient’s decisions related to smoking cessation, low interest in the topic among residents who were smokers themselves, and shortage of time for counseling patients during hospitalization due to their short in-hospital stay.

Conclusions:
Most of the participants were interested in the smoking cessation training course and helping their patients to quit. The study team will need to account for the identified barriers for the successful implementation of the program.

Funding:
The study was a part of a larger collaborative project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Gohar Abelyan   
Zvart Avedisian Onanian Center for Health Services Research and Development, Gerald and Patricia Turpanjian School of Public Health, American University of Armenia
eISSN:2459-3087