CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Smoking in adolescents and young adults childhood cancer survivors
 
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Pediatric Environmental Health Speciality Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Laboratory of Environmental and Human Health (A5) Institute of Biomedical Research, IMIB-Arrixaca, Clinical University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Alberto Cárceles Álvarez   

Pediatric Environmental Health Speciality Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Laboratory of Environmental and Human Health (A5) Institute of Biomedical Research, IMIB-Arrixaca, Clinical University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
Publish date: 2018-06-13
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2018;4(Supplement):A131
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
It is estimated that 70% of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) will present a late effect derived from the treatments used during the acute phase of cancer throughout their life, some of them potentially serious as cardiac dysfunctions or subsequent neoplasms. Smoking may increase the frequency and severity of these late effects.
AIM: To present the prevalence of smokers in adolescents and young adults attending a long-term follow-up consultation in a Mediterranean Region.

Methods:
Descriptive cross-sectional study. Smoking status was analyzed in adolescents and young adults CCS attending the Long-Term Follow-Up Program in the Clinical University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca (Murcia, Spain) during 2017.

Results:
113 adolescents and young adults were analyzed (54.9% males) with ages between 15 and 34 years (median = 20 years). 14.2% of the CCS were smokers (11.5% daily smokers and 2.7% occasional smokers) with a median consumption of 32.5 cigarette / week; 2.7% were ex-smokers. The average age of onset in smoking was 16.4 years. In their residence, 52.2% were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, with 36.6% of mothers and 34.6% of parents smoking.

Conclusions:
The percentage of smokers in our group is similar to that of other studies in CCS (8 - 29%) and is below the Spanish average. However, in a group so sensitive to the harmful effects of tobacco, it is essential to carry out intensive interventions in order to eliminate consumption. The prevention work in children and non-smokers is basic to prevent them from starting the consumption.

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