CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Social context of smoking among non-institutionalized adults: results from 12 US states, 2015
 
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Northeastern University, Boston, USA
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Hermine Poghosyan   

Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, 02115 Boston, MA, USA
Publish date: 2017-05-25
Submission date: 2017-04-26
Acceptance date: 2017-04-28
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2017;3(May Supplement):53
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ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Examine the association between social context and smoking status among non-institutionalized adults.

Material and Methods:
Cross-sectional data from 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System on 67,290 non-institutionalized adults, were analyzed. Sample weights were applied to generalize results to 27.5 million adults, in 12 US states. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression were conducted.

Results:
In 2015, 19.2% (5.3 million) were current, 25.0% (6.9 million) former, and 55.7% (15.3 million) never smokers. Approximately, 40.0% were 55 years of age or older, 52.6% female, 72.0% non-Hispanic whites, and 55.7% were married. About, 16.0% of adults reported that they always worried or stressed about having enough money to pay the rent or mortgage in the past 12 months. About 11.0% of adults reported that they always worried or stressed about having enough money to buy nutritious meals in the past 12 months. Controlling for all covariates, participants who always (AOR 2.58, 95% CI 2.32-2.89) and sometimes (AOR 1.59, 95% CI 1.43-1.79) reported being worried or stressed about having enough money to pay the rent or mortgage in the past 12 months were significantly more likely to be current smokers than never smokers. Controlling for all covariate, participants who always (AOR 2.37, 95% CI 2.10-2.68) and sometimes (AOR 1.62, 95% CI 1.44-1.83) reported being worried or stressed about having enough money to buy nutritious meals in the past 12 months were significantly more likely to be current smokers than never smokers.

Conclusions:
To reduce smoking prevalence, it is important to target social context of smoking.

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