SHORT REPORT
Sociodemographic correlates of intention to quit smoking for good among U.S. adult menthol and non-menthol smokers: Evidence from the 2013–2014 National Adult Tobacco Survey
 
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Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Publish date: 2018-05-24
Submission date: 2018-03-12
Final revision date: 2018-04-23
Acceptance date: 2018-05-11
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2018;4(May):22
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
Introduction:
In the U.S. significant progress has been made to reduce cigarette use, yet menthol cigarette use is a continuing public health problem, especially among young adults and Black/African Americans. Smoking cessation is warranted to reduce smoking-related diseases and premature death. Ample evidence has demonstrated that having an intention to quit smoking is strongly associated with attaining cessation. The objective of this study was to identify and compare the sociodemographic correlates of intention to quit smoking for good between menthol and non-menthol adult smokers in the U.S.

Methods:
A cross-sectional secondary data analysis was conducted on the 2013– 2014 National Adult Tobacco Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze individual factors and their relation to intention to quit smoking for good. The total sample was nationally representative of the U.S. population and included 10 121 adult smokers aged ≥18 years.

Results:
Among menthol smokers, non-Hispanic Blacks (adjusted odds ratio, AOR=1.31, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.03–1.67) were significantly (p=0.03) more likely to have an intention to quit smoking for good compared to non- Hispanic Whites. Young adults aged 18–25 years (AOR=0.70, 95% CI: 0.58–0.85) were significantly (p=0.01) less likely to have an intention to quit compared to adults aged 50 years and older, and sexual minorities (i.e. lesbian, gay, bisexual) (AOR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.49–0.93) were significantly (p=0.03) less likely to have the intention to quit compared to heterosexuals. Among non-menthol smokers, adults aged 26–34 years (AOR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.13–1.88) and 35–49 years (AOR=1.71, 95% CI: 1.34–2.20) were significantly (p=0.01; p< 0.001, respectively) more likely to have an intention to quit smoking for good compared to those aged 50 years and older.

Conclusions:
Study findings provide insight into the association of menthol cigarette consumption with intention to quit smoking for good, notably among Black Americans, young adults and sexual minorities. Smoking cessation efforts should consider demographics and menthol smoking status.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Sabrina L. Smiley   
Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2001 North Soto Street Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
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