CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
The benefits of quitting smoking for people with cancer
 
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1
Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Serbia
2
Department of Social medicine, Institute for Public Health Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
3
Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
Publish date: 2019-03-26
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2019;5(Supplement):A110
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ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Smoking has been linked to cancer occurrence and survival rates for a long time. However, there is little research into the impacts of smoking on oncological treatments. The aim of the study is to show the impact that smoking can have on the effects of cancer therapy.

Methods:
Epidemiological situation analysis of the malignant diseases based on the data of incidence and mortality and the impact of smoking on the results of treatment.

Results:
At the time of establishing the diagnosis, the incidence of smoking varies from 10 to 95 per cent (<5% for breast cancer and > 60% for lung cancer). The previous research indicates that continuing smoking after the establishment of a diagnosis can impact the treatment outcomes and is related to worse prognosis and survival rate. Active smoking can be connected to lower survival rates with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, limited small cell lung cancer, bladder cancer, and upper tract urothelial cancer. The smokers suffering from prostate cancer have a higher risk of death outcomes and worse prognoses after the treatment. The research has shown that there is a link between smoking and slower wound healing in operated patients and that it can also intensify the side-effects of chemotherapy and prolong the responses to radiation.

Conclusions:
It is essential to increase knowledge about the health benefits of quitting smoking in order to advance the results of oncological treatments. Implemented smoking cessation programs need to be adapted to oncology patients.

eISSN:2459-3087