RESEARCH PAPER
Tobacco use in Lao People’s Democratic Republic: Results from the 2015 National Adult Tobacco Survey
 
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1
National Center for Laboratory and Epidemiology, Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Lao PDR
2
Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Lao PDR
3
Lao Tropical and Public Health Institute, Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Lao PDR
4
Department of Hygiene and Health Promotion, Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Lao PDR
5
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma, United States
6
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma, United States
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Thanh Cong Bui   

Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 400, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, United States
Publish date: 2019-09-30
Submission date: 2019-04-15
Final revision date: 2019-06-12
Acceptance date: 2019-09-09
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2019;5(September):31
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Tobacco use is a burden for Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). No published report has examined determinants of various tobacco uses to inform appropriate policies and prevention strategies. This paper reports tobacco uses by sociodemographic characteristics using data from the most recent Lao National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS) in 2015.

Methods:
The NATS included a nationally representative sample of 7562 people aged ≥15 years, recruited through a stratified 2-stage cluster sampling approach in 18 provinces. All analyses were weighted. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate unadjusted and adjusted associations between variables of interest.

Results:
The NATS results showed that 32.4% of Lao people aged ≥15 years were current tobacco users (men: 51.2%, women: 15.4%). Cigarette smoking accounted for approximately 95% of all tobacco use in men, while tobacco chewing accounted for 60% of tobacco use in women. Current tobacco use was strongly associated with older ages and lower education levels (p<0.001). There were interactions between sex, education level, and income associated with tobacco use; specifically, women were more likely to have a lower education level and lower income than men, and these women were more likely to use tobacco.

Conclusions:
Tobacco use prevalence in Lao PDR was among the highest in the region. There were variations in types and prevalence of tobacco use across sociodemographic subpopulations. The Lao government should continue current national tobacco control efforts and implement additional proven strategies to reduce tobacco use.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
We thank the Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance (SEATCA) and Lao Ministry of Health for supporting the survey. We appreciate the guidance from Mondha Kengganpanich and Sarunya Benjakul at the Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, Thailand. We thank Maniphanh Vongphosy and all the staff at the Lao-SEATCA office for their kind support. We thank all the staff at the Lao National Institute of Public Health for their hard work in data collection. TCB is supported by a grant from the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust (092-016-0002) and in part by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Support Grant P30CA225520 awarded to the University of Oklahoma Stephenson Cancer Center. The content of the manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
This work was supported by the Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance (SEATCA).
AUTHORS' CONTRIBUTIONS
PX and KP oversaw the survey implementation. PX, DD and LS developed measures and supervised data collection. LTT and TCB analyzed the data and prepared the manuscript. All authors participated in editing the manuscript.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
 
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