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Current practices and perceived barriers to tobacco treatment delivery among healthcare professionals from 15 European countries. The EPACTT Plus project
 
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1
European Network for Smoking and Tobacco Prevention, Brussels, Belgium
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Clinic of Social and Family Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece
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Department of Healthcare, Faculty of Health, University of Vlora, Vlore, Albania
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Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Canada
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Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
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Institute of Leadership and Healthcare Management, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia
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University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Grigore T.Popa’, Iasi, Romania
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AER PUR Romania, Bucharest, Romania
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Kosovo Advocacy and Development Center, Prishtina, Kosovo
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Turpanjian School of Public Health, American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia
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Respiratory Society of North Macedonia, Skopje, North Macedonia
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Comité Nacional de Prevención del Tabaquismo, Madrid, Spain
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Tobacco Control Alliance of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia
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University of Cantabria, Cantabria, Spain
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Foundation ‘Smart Health – Health in 3D’, Warsaw, Poland
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Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland
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Department of Public Health & Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy
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SITAB, Società Italiana di Tabaccologia, Rome, Italy
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Slovenian Coalition for Tobacco Control, Ljubljana, Slovenia
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Institute of Public Health of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
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Kyiv Health Center, Kyiv, Ukraine
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George D. Behrakis Research Laboratory, Athens, Greece
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Hellenic Cancer Society, Athens, Greece
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Wallionie Tabac Prevention, Brussels, Belgium
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Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Charis Girvalaki   

European Network for Smoking and Tobacco Prevention, Brussels, Belgium
Publication date: 2020-01-21
Submission date: 2019-10-21
Final revision date: 2019-12-02
Acceptance date: 2019-12-03
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2020;6(January):6
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
The latest evidence-based Guidelines for Treating Tobacco Dependence highlight the significant role of healthcare professionals in supporting smokers interested to quit. This study aimed to identify the current practices of healthcare professionals in Europe and perceived barriers in delivering tobacco treatment to their patients who smoke.

Methods:
In the context of EPACTT-Plus, collaborating institutions from 15 countries (Albania, Armenia, Belgium, Italy, France, Georgia, Greece, Kosovo, Romania, North Macedonia, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Ukraine) worked for the development of an accredited eLearning course on Tobacco Treatment Delivery available at http:// elearning-ensp.eu/. In total, 444 healthcare professionals from the wider European region successfully completed the course from December 2018 to July 2019. Cross-sectional data were collected online on healthcare professionals’ current practices and perceived barriers in introducing tobacco-dependence treatment into their daily clinical life.

Results:
At registration, 41.2% of the participants reported having asked their patients if they smoked. Advise to quit smoking was offered by 47.1% of the participants, while 29.5% reported offering assistance to their patients who smoked in order to quit. From the total number of participants, 39.9% regarded the lack of patient compliance as a significant barrier. Other key barriers were lack of: interest from the patients (37.4%), healthcare professionals training (33.1%), community resources to refer patients (31.5%), and adequate time during their everyday clinical life (29.7%).

Conclusions:
The identification of current practices and significant barriers is important to build evidence-based guidelines and training programs (online and/or live) that will improve the performance of healthcare professionals in offering tobacco-dependence treatment for their patients who smoke.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors wish to express their thanks to the Global Bridges tobacco dependence treatment network, and in particular Katie Kemper and Taylor Hays for their support.
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
This work was supported by Global Bridges: Healthcare Alliance for Tobacco Dependence Treatment, and Pfizer Independent Grants for Learning and Change (GB- 25944945).
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Commissioned; externally peer-reviewed.
 
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