CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Sociodemographic inequalities in cigarette, smokeless tobacco, waterpipe tobacco, and electronic cigarette use among adolescents in 114 countries: a cross-sectional analysis
 
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Public Health Policy Evaluation Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Filippos T. Filippidis   

Public Health Policy Evaluation Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Publication date: 2023-04-25
 
Tob. Prev. Cessation 2023;9(Supplement):A82
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction:
The majority of tobacco and nicotine users start using them in adolescence. In order to keep equity considerations at the forefront of tobacco control, it is crucial to assess whether inequalities in prevalence of tobacco and nicotine use exist among adolescents globally.

Material and Methods:
We analysed Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) data from 538,644 school-based adolescents (79.3% aged 13-15 years) in 114 countries (2013-2019). Data were collected on current (past-30 day) use of cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, waterpipe tobacco and electronic cigarettes. We used weighted Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, pocket money and age to assess differences in prevalence of current use between boys and girls and between students with high vs. low pocket money.

Results:
Although there was substantial regional variation, in most countries boys were statistically significantly more likely to report current use of all assessed products (ranging from 50.0% of countries for waterpipe tobacco to 73.3% of countries for electronic cigarettes). Inequalities by sex were less pronounced in Europe compared to other regions. Inequalities by pocket money were less consistent; students with more pocket money were more likely to report current use of cigarettes (vs. those with less pocket money) in 61.8% of the countries, but more likely to report current use of smokeless tobacco in only 18.3% of countries.

Conclusions:
We found that, globally, boys and adolescents with more pocket money are generally more likely to use a range of tobacco and nicotine products. However, these patterns are not universal and local variations should be taken into consideration to design effective and equitable tobacco control policies.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.
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